Posts filed under Habit Changes

The Connection Between Sleep, Binge Eating & Weight Gain

**BEEP BEEP BEEP**

“UGHH…” I thought to myself… ” After more seconds, my boyfriend then proceeded to climb over me to turn off the alarm that was meant to signal it was time for me to get up.

Even this morning, I had planned to get up early to blog and work on some items for my clients but after realizing the even the caffeine from my boyfriend’s Chai Tea wasn’t helping, I soon realized how sleep deprived I was and that I had been staying up late for combination of things this week, including but not limited to dance classes, hanging out with my boyfriend, watching countless videos on Instagram, and binge watching the entire 3rd season of “Stranger Things” (yes, so guilty here, even coaches have things they can consistently improve upon!)

I know for a fact that when I don’t get enough sleep, I’m less productive with work, make poorer decisions, and find myself in more mind-numbing situations, such as scrolling through Facebook or watching hours of TV.  Lack of sleep just seems to compound on itself… You feel so tired that you’re less efficient, meaning you may stay up later to get something done or get more distracted, and hence continues the cycle of feeling like *SHIT*.  (Also, have you ever thought to yourself, if someone says to you, “You look tired.. That they’re actually saying you look like SHIT?” Anyways, I digress :D ...).

This brings me to my point… I have found that sleep to be one of the keystone habits that set everything else in your life up for success.  Whether you’re cranking it out at the gym, working hard in the office, or taking care of kids, you need sleep. It’s the time our bodies have for rest, rejuvenation and repair.


In fact, when we look at the connection between lack of sleep, binge eating, and weight gain, we find countless anecdotes and studies that show:

  • Lack of sleep increases cravings and and especially for high-calorie foods 

  • Lack of sleep has affects on our mood - which may lead you to overeat, binge, or take it out on your significant other

  • Lack of sleep impacts our effectiveness in everything - our ability to reason, to complete our workouts, and to communicate and be present at work and at home

When I look back on the days, when I personally struggled with nighttime binge eating, I realize how insidious the cycle was.  When I’d stay up late to finish an assignment, I would often use food to keep me company and stay awake. Since my willpower was lower at the end of the day, I would often binge or overeat.  At some point, eating at night became such a habit that even if I didn’t have a good reason to stay up, I would find myself picking from the fridge and (I was embarrassed to say) picking food from my roommates.  Eating late would then disrupt my sleep even set me up to be even more tired and feeling disgusted the next day.

I am so very glad that this pattern is something that does not affect me today.  I would argue that sleep is one of the most important habits to prioritize if you’re looking beat binge eating and improve your eating habits.

So here are my recommendations to improve the quality of your sleep:

  1. Examine your current habits.  Then make your plan to improve your sleep duration and/or quality.

Whenever we want to change something, we first have to understand where we are.  I recommend taking some time to reflect on your current habits. What time do you tend to go to bed?  What are you doing before bedtime? How easy is it for you to fall asleep at night? What time do you tend to get up?  How do you feel in the morning when you get up? Are you energized and alert? Do you wake up without the alarm clock? Or when the alarm goes off do you snooze and roll over?  If it’s the latter, you could use more sleep!

On average, people need anywhere from 7-8 hours of sleep; however, we are all different so this would require a bit of experimentation.  I would recommend to start with planning out your bedtime at least 8 hours from the time you wake up, then seeing if after a week if you wake up naturally before or after the alarm clock.  If you find you go to bed at 11, with the plan of waking up at 7 am, but keep waking up at 6:30 am, this probably means your body needs 7.5 hours optimally.

If you find yourself staying up late often and not being able to give yourself the full 8 hours to sleep, I recommend examining why this is happening and what you are doing during this time.  Are you staying up late watching TV, working on assignments for school or work, and/or eating? How is this serving you? Or if it’s not, what might you do to change the situation?

  1. Increase your blue light exposure during the day and decrease it at night.

Blue light is essentially like caffeine for your brain.  The sun is the biggest producer of blue light, so as the sun sets in the evening, it turns on our hormones, specifically melatonin, to signal that it’s time to sleep.  Fast forward to modern day, where we have 24/7 exposure to blue light from our laptops, computers, and televisions, the natural signals that our bodies produce for sleep 

So I recommend spending some time in the sunlight each day to increase your blue light exposure or investing in one of those artificial bright lights, especially if you live in an area with limited sun exposure like Seattle where I currently reside.

At night, turn off you electronics 2 hours before bed time.  You can also look into certain applications that turn off the blue light on your devices.  Lastly, I’m personally experimenting with blue light glasses, which you can put on at dusk to limit your blue light exposure.  (Now that Stranger things is done… I myself will be putting this back into practice)

2.  Stop eating at least 2 hours before bed time

Many people feel uncomfortable and are unable to sleep well if they are too full from eating.  I recommend refraining from eating within 2 hours of bedtime. Some people prefer to go to bed a “little hungry,” while others (including myself) prefer a neutral state (“I’m neither hungry nor full, not really thinking about food”).  Plan out your meals so that you can honor your bedtime.  

If you struggle with night time eating, it’s time to take a look at your eating habits during the day… Are you getting enough food earlier in the day or are you starving yourself and then reaching for whatever you can find in the evening?  

3.  Get moving!  But not too close to bedtime

Exercise has been scientifically proven to improve sleep quality and duration.  However, for some people, exercising too close to bedtime can lead to disrupted sleep (this includes yours truly).  In general, aim to end intense exercise at least 2 before sleep and experiment to find which activities you can do more close to bedtime (perhaps yoga) vs. would be better for earlier in the day.

4.  Create your winding down routine and make it a habit

I find that certain activities riles me up, while others calm me down.  If you’re having issues with getting to bed on time, perhaps it’s time to examine what you’re doing leading up to sleep.  My personal favorite is something I picked up from another coach, which is to read fiction in the evening. I find it’s a nice way to escape the day-to-day care and relax before bedtime.

I’ve also found that meditation at night is a great way to calm my chattering mind down.  In fact, before I discovered meditation, I would often struggle with sleepless nights where my brain was chattering loudly.  Apps like Insight Timer offer free meditations that you can use to calm your mind.

6.  Seek professional help if needed

Seek help from a qualified doctor, therapist, or coach if needed.  You deserve a good night’s rest!

So if you or anyone you know has ever uttered, “Sleep is for the weak!” I think it’s time to challenge those beliefs.  Sleep is for the powerful and the sexy. It sets everything else up for success - so why not sleep your way to the top?  Also, if you’re looking to change your eating habits and beat binge eating, the first steps may just be to get a good night’s rest tonight!


How Loneliness & Isolation Perpetuates the Binge Eating Cycle

 Just as physical hunger is the signal for us to eat, and thirst is the single for us to drink water, loneliness is a signal for us to seek connection.  Unfortunately, what keeps so many people stuck from seeking the connection and support they need is shame.  Shame is the belief that inherently there is something wrong and broken with us and therefore we are unworthy of true love and belonging.  This differs from guilt, which is a signal that we have acted out of alignment of our values. While guilt says we’ve done something bad or wrong (that could be changed), shame insidiously tells us we are bad or wrong.

The cycle so often goes like this for food and so many other addictive-type behaviors:

Feel intense loneliness and shame —> binge eat —> isolate oneself and feel more lonely and shameful —> continue binge eating

I’ve seen from my experience and that of my clients that feeling out-of-control with food in itself is painful.   Add on top of that feeling like you’re alone and the only one struggling with the issue and the experience can be excruciating.

A Brain Science Perspective on Binge Eating + How to Break Free from the Habit

I’m sitting her in a coffee shop where I just enjoyed some tea and a cupcake (gluten-free for me ;), having fully enjoyed experience of eating.  To think, in the past I feared cupcakes and would avoid them at all costs…

Flashback to 2013….I remember a particular morning I woke up, feeling bloated and disgusted with myself.  I had binged the night before going completely mindless with food. For me, binge eating started as an occasional occurrence in middle and high school, but once I started my first year of college, it had become an daily nightmare.  I was in my 4th year of college at the time, which had been incredibly stressful with the number of classes I was taking, trying to balance my extracurriculars and social life, and uncertainty about my future career.

I look back with compassion on the writings of my younger self.  I wish someone could have told her that overcoming binge eating wouldn’t always be a linear process.  There were some days I would learn a new concept or tool and do really well my eating.  “Yes!!! Finally!  I’d tell myself… this is the answer.”  Inevitably, the new “diet high” would wear off and I would be back to where I started.  Then I’d beat myself up and wonder if something was wrong with me or even binge to escape the sense of unworthiness I felt.

Looking back, I wish someone had told me to be gentle with myself.  After all, I was doing my very best.  I wish someone had told me that change and healing isn’t always linear.  At the time, I think it’s something I understood theoretically but didn’t fully embody especially having come from a culture and expectation of “Straight  A’s” all the time.

So let me tell you this, if you struggle with the dieting-binge eating-repeat cycle, there is nothing wrong with you.  You just need a better understanding of yourself and your biology.

The Real Cost of “Free Food”

There are many variations to this story – perhaps it’s free samples at the grocery store or an abundance of different food at a party.  In the case of “free food,” the mind often defaults to how great the opportunity is.  However, in choosing “free food,” you may find that in exchange you are giving up something- perhaps sabotaging your commitment to your health goals or just that feeling of vitality.  In my case, I found myself feeling sluggish after all my “free food fun” in Costa Rica.

So how can we make more conscious decisions that best serve us?  The first step is to bring awareness and learning to the situation.  

Setting the Minimum – When doing less makes you more successful

Hey there!  How are those resolutions going?  If you’re like me with my past resolutions - by week 2, I could feel myself slipping, and by the final week of January, I had already given up.

The truth is I myself find big goals sexy.  I can see myself now… in 6-months, I have rock hard abs and I’m sporting a white bikini on beach having flown to Costa Rica on my private jet where I live on an island surrounded by dolphins.  So naturally, my goals this week are to: cut out all sugar and processed foods, to exercise 4 hours a day– and oh yeah ,did I mention I’m going to land 10 new clients to start paying off the price of the vacation?

Okayyyy, that’s a grand exaggeration – but you get the point!